Maryann Driscoll VMI 09

girlwithalessonplan:

An AP link to this story went up on a local news Facebook page, and the comments from adults was so discouraging.

  • "These kids need to learn what the read world is like."
  • "Parents need to take away electronics and they’ll go to bed!"
  • "Time for parents to start whooping their kids and parenting."
  • "Oh look another example of catering to kids."

Like…did they not read the article?  It’s freaking BIOLOGY.  

I went to high school before the big technology shift.  I didn’t have a TV or gaming system in my room.  I had a desktop computer with dial up my junior and senior year.  I had a land line phone.  But I wasn’t up late talking on the phone or chatting on ICQ.  I was wide awake reading or poking at my homework because I legitimately couldn’t sleep.  I remember falling asleep in the shower when I was a kid.  

Our day starts at 8 a.m.  We already have a school day at the high school that is over an hour longer than legally required.  Is it seriously that absurd to push back a half hour or an hour?  And would even shifting the entire day from 8-3:15 to go 9-4:15 be more similar to the average work day?

How is this a crazy suggestion suddenly soaked in the coddling of children?

The hard part of teaching is coming to grips with this:

There is never enough.

There is never enough time. There are never enough resources. There is never enough you.

As a teacher, you can see what a perfect job in your classroom would look like. You know all the assignments you should be giving. You know all the feedback you should be providing your students. You know all the individual crafting that should provide for each individual’s instruction. You know all the material you should be covering. You know all the ways in which, when the teachable moment emerges (unannounced as always), you can greet it with a smile and drop everything to make it grow and blossom.

You know all this, but you can also do the math. 110 papers about the view of death in American Romantic writing times 15 minutes to respond with thoughtful written comments equals — wait! what?! That CAN’T be right! Plus quizzes to assess where we are in the grammar unit in order to design a new remedial unit before we craft the final test on that unit (five minutes each to grade). And that was before Chris made that comment about Poe that offered us a perfect chance to talk about the gothic influences, and then Alex and Pat started a great discussion of gothic influences today. And I know that if my students are really going to get good at writing, they should be composing something at least once a week. And if I am going to prepare my students for life in the real world, I need to have one of my own to be credible.

If you are going to take any control of your professional life, you have to make some hard, conscious decisions. What is it that I know I should be doing that I am not going to do?

Every year you get better. You get faster, you learn tricks, you learn which corners can more safely be cut, you get better at predicting where the student-based bumps in the road will appear. A good administrative team can provide a great deal of help.

But every day is still educational triage. You will pick and choose your battles, and you will always be at best bothered, at worst haunted, by the things you know you should have done but didn’t. Show me a teacher who thinks she’s got everything all under control and doesn’t need to fix a thing for next year, and I will show you a lousy teacher. The best teachers I’ve ever known can give you a list of exactly what they don’t do well enough yet.

From one of the best essays we’ve read on teaching in a while.

The Hard Part

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/peter-greene/the-hardest-part-teaching_b_5554448.html

(via weareteachers)

This. A million times this.

(via hisnamewasbeanni)

All of it.

(via ummno)

Yes, this!

(via wincherella)

This is exactly it! Speechless…

The last thing that we introduced, which I think really makes for great practice, was the use of highlighters in our marking. Rather than just having the two comments at the end with a positive and a target, we now colour code these in blue and yellow. Blue = www (what went well), yellow = ebi (even better if). The students know what the colours stand for and the students work looks great. We don’t cover the whole lot in highlighter, but pick out key bits that correspond to the comments at the end. And, if you keep on top of it, it really isn’t all that time consuming.

Marking for England or Marking for Effect: a feedback journey.

I like this idea.

(via englishteacheronline)

I did something similar this year with specific assignments for my students. Before giving it to them I would tell them that it would be graded with highlighters-which let them know what I was looking for, as we had gone over what each color meant and there was a poster sized key on the wall.

I had noticed that often times instead of answering a specific question, students would just give me a simple summary of the reading instead. If they did attempt to answer the question at hand, they had a knack for including all kinds of irrelevant information.

Green = You nailed it! High five!

Blue = This is a summary. Make sure you re-read the question and answer it directly using textual evidence.

Pink = This is irrelevant information. Cut it out and replace with more pertinent evidence.

Any other info they needed was written in as usual, but specifically for question/answer type assignments I found this really helped cut down on my grading time (once I got the hang of it,) and it helped the students have better access to the feedback they received (once they got the hang of it.)

I have done the same thing with math assessments. Blue for a level 4- this work is above expectations. Green for a level 3- you got it right at expectations. Yellow for level 2- you’re showing some understanding but making some errors and need support to consolidate understanding. Orange for level 1or below- this is an area you need to focus on.

(via coloursinaflower)

Reblogging to remember

(via wincherella)

Reblogging to remember- great ideas for me to be specific and students to have next steps built in.

heyfunniest:

Good Idea.


There you go!

heyfunniest:

Good Idea.

There you go!

6dogs9cats:

Share This: Atlanta’s snowstorm reminds us once again why teachers are worth so much more than they are paid. And why the politicians continually obsessed with cutting their salaries are paid so much more than they are worth.


Amen!

6dogs9cats:

Share This: Atlanta’s snowstorm reminds us once again why teachers are worth so much more than they are paid. And why the politicians continually obsessed with cutting their salaries are paid so much more than they are worth.

Amen!

wincherella:

itsssnix:

betheteacheryouloved:

sumardihamid:

Curious about the level of engagement of your students in your class?
This infographic will help you to understand about the engagement levels of your students. It is inevitable for teachers to know the engagement levels of their students so that they will be able to recognize and understand the status of their classroom, whether or not it is the highly engaged, well-managed or pathological classrooms. Having that in mind, the teachers can do something to improve the status of the classroom if it needs remedial actions before it becomes worst.
Source: http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/11/a-must-see-visual-featuring-5-levels-of.html
Other links: http://www.schlechtycenter.org/system/tool_attachment/4046/original/sc_pdf_engagement.pdf?1272415798http://www.cobbk12.org/sites/ALT/training/forms/cwt/Engagement.ppt

Very informative. I like that it shows there is no such thing as “perfect.”

Whoa - I never reblog, but this is incredibly useful. I’d like to map out my classes with this.

I have printed it to hang near my desk in the classroom as a reminder. 

Something to think about as I write next semester’s goal.

wincherella:

itsssnix:

betheteacheryouloved:

sumardihamid:

Curious about the level of engagement of your students in your class?

This infographic will help you to understand about the engagement levels of your students. It is inevitable for teachers to know the engagement levels of their students so that they will be able to recognize and understand the status of their classroom, whether or not it is the highly engaged, well-managed or pathological classrooms. Having that in mind, the teachers can do something to improve the status of the classroom if it needs remedial actions before it becomes worst.

Source: http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2013/11/a-must-see-visual-featuring-5-levels-of.html

Other links:
http://www.schlechtycenter.org/system/tool_attachment/4046/original/sc_pdf_engagement.pdf?1272415798
http://www.cobbk12.org/sites/ALT/training/forms/cwt/Engagement.ppt

Very informative. I like that it shows there is no such thing as “perfect.”

Whoa - I never reblog, but this is incredibly useful. I’d like to map out my classes with this.

I have printed it to hang near my desk in the classroom as a reminder. 

Something to think about as I write next semester’s goal.

reblog if you were born in 1985 or earlier

wincherella:

amiteachingyet:

wincherella:

maybemaibe:

verlysgaminglife:

vixyish:

anghraine:

for science

This has depressingly few notes.

… very few

Way before.

Waaaaayyyyyy before. Like, a decade. Boom.

More than two for me. 

More than 2 decades for me too

wincherella:

hisnamewasbeanni:

madmanwithabible:

lifehackable:

See More Daily Life Hacks Here

I’m the healthiest human alive

Uh huh sure it is.

Good to know something about me is healthy.

Phew…

wincherella:

hisnamewasbeanni:

madmanwithabible:

lifehackable:

See More Daily Life Hacks Here

I’m the healthiest human alive

Uh huh sure it is.

Good to know something about me is healthy.

Phew…

Let us grant that the pursuit of mathematics is a divine madness of the human spirit, a refuge from the goading urgency of contingent happenings.
Alfred North Whitehead (via centerofmath)

So true!!!

VMI 09 turned 2 today! Potatoheads unite!

VMI 09 turned 2 today! Potatoheads unite!